Tag: deploy

How to deploy your WordPress site with Bedrock and Moss

How to deploy your WordPress site with Bedrock and Moss

- - Articles

WordPress developers have their own workflows, and they sometimes differ from the usual ones in other CMS or frameworks. However, Bedrock allows you to manage WordPress and related plugins as any other PHP dependency via composer. It also creates a better project structure that puts WordPress in its own subdirectory. These nice features make Bedrock a great alternative to consider when developing WordPress sites, since you can follow a typical PHP development workflow: Update dependencies locally, commit your composer.lock, and deploy your application to your testing/staging environment (or to production, eventually).

If you also take advantage of Moss‘s zero-downtime deployments, your WordPress development workflow becomes a breeze. In this article we’ll see how to create and deploy your Bedrock site with Moss. If you don’t have an account yet, sign up at our Free Plan which includes unlimited sites and servers.

Automatic zero-downtime GitLab deployments

Automatic zero-downtime GitLab deployments

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Last week we supported GitLab as a first-class citizen in Moss. If you host your application code in GitLab.com repositories, you can now enjoy all Moss features that previously were only available for GitHub and Bitbucket. As in the latter cases, you just have to authorize Moss to access your GitLab account and it’ll be able to deploy your GitLab-hosted repos.

In this way you can trigger automatic deployments after pushing your code, or deploy manually with just one click. In either case, your websites will benefit from a zero-downtime process. Want to know the details? Please keep reading 😀

Changelog 2018-10-31

Changelog 2018-10-31

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Sites

    • Full GitLab support. Native integration with GitLab – link your GitLab account and let Moss deploy your web applications easily. This enables push-to-deploy in all your GitLab repositories.

Servers

    • Default HTTPS site. Requests for websites that don’t exist on the server will be directed to a default (blank) page. This behavior was already implemented for HTTP, now it also applies when the website is requested over HTTPS. Existing users may force this configuration by provisioning an existing site or creating a new one on the server.

UX

    • Several minor bug fixes and improvements in the web application.
Changelog 2018-08-14

Changelog 2018-08-14

- - Changelog

SITES

    • Deploy logs. The output of your deployment scripts is stored within folder logs/deploy/ of the corresponding site. In this way you can check what happened in your latest deployment at any moment.
Changelog 2018-06-29

Changelog 2018-06-29

- - Changelog

SITES

    • Custom shared paths per site. If you use Moss to deploy a website via git, now you can tell Moss the folders and files that must persist across deployments (e.g. user uploads, application logs, configuration files, etc). Before this feature, Moss knew what files to persist in Laravel and Symfony websites. Now you can customize such configs and also specify persistent paths for any kind of website (in a git repo) that you deploy with Moss.

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