Moss blog

Changelog 2018-06-20

Changelog 2018-06-20

- - Changelog

UX

  • When a website linked to a git repo hasn’t been deployed yet, you’ll see a more meaningful message now.
  • All relevant Type A DNS records for a website are shown now. This includes www and wildcard records if they apply.
  • Prevent some website configs that don’t make sense – e.g. don’t allow you to create a redirection for www.www.domain.com.
  • Don’t allow you to create a database user called root, since that would overwrite the permissions of the MySQL’s root user.
A name resolution issue with systemd-resolved we found in the wild

A name resolution issue with systemd-resolved we found in the wild

- - Articles

As you may know, you can connect Moss to your fresh Ubuntu 18.04 or 16.04 server – regardless the provider where such server is hosted. Moss also features native integrations with some cloud providers (Amazon, DigitalOcean, Google and Vultr as of this writing), but you can use Moss with any vps, cloud instance, or even physical server – not a common use case, but feasible anyway.

A few days ago a customer was having an issue when trying to connect an Ubuntu 18.04 instance (hosted on his provider of choice) to Moss. So I decided to create an account on such provider and investigate the problem. It turned out that the provider’s image had some “suboptimal” configurations and that the default solution for name resolution in Ubuntu 18.04 (bionic) has some related bugs. I think the problem is interesting enough to be shared, and it’ll also allow us to talk about systemd and, more specifically, systemd-resolved for name resolution.

Changelog 2018-06-15

Changelog 2018-06-15

- - Changelog

SERVERS

  • Connecting your server to Moss is easier now. In order to authorize Moss to set up your server, you just need to copy&paste one command.

SITES

  • You can choose Nginx (standalone) or Nginx+Apache for any website you create with Moss.
  • You can choose the root dir where your application is served in all websites you create with Moss.
  • You can change the webserver and root dir of your websites at any moment.
  • You may leave your website’s root dir empty if needed.
The Moss blog begins… at last!

The Moss blog begins… at last!

- - General

We’ve wanted to start this blog for a long time, so that we can write about the web, systems administration, software development, security, good practices, products and services we love, and of course, about the latest Moss news (if you don’t want to miss a post, subscribe to the blog in the form below and we’ll notify you as we publish new content).

The world might not need a new blog (hehe), but we have two good reasons to write here. 1) We feel like doing it ?; and 2) we believe it can be useful to our customers and other web development professionals. We didn’t start it before because the entire team was focused on developing Moss – we couldn’t dedicate the required time to create quality content at a regular pace. Now the team’s grown, the time has come for us to start writing!

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